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Anadenanthera colubrina: Vilka or Yopo
Freshly harvested Trichocereus pachanoi exquisite/exotic cuttings for sale
Trihocereus peruvianus, Peruvian Torch cactus seeds for sale
Summer 2015 Lophophora decipiens seeds
Buy freshly harvested Trichocereus bridgesii, San Pedro, Achuma cactus exquisite rooted cuttings
Purchase Trichocereus bridgesii, San Pedro cactus, Achuma, Bolivian Torch cactus seeds.
Purchase Trichocereus bridgesii dried cactus products
Freshly harvested Trichocereus pachanoi exquisite/exotic cuttings for sale
A legume tree with leaves and branches that look much like Desmanthus and Mimosa.
Anadenanthera colubrina (also known as Vilca, Huilco, Huilca, Wilco, Willka, Cebil, or Angico) is a South American tree closely related to Anadenanthera peregrina. It grows from 5 m to 20 m tall and the trunk is very thorny. The leaves are mimosa-like, up to 30 cm in length and they fold up at night. In Chile, A. colubrina produces flowers from September to December and bean pods from September to July. In Brazil A. colubrina has been given "high priority" conservation status.
A. colubrina grows at altitudes of about 315-2200 m with roughly 250-600 mm/year (10-24 in/yr) of precipitation and a mean temperature of 21 įC. It tends to grow on rocky hillsides in well-drained soil, often in the vicinity of rivers. It grows quickly at 1-1.5 m/year in good conditions. The growing areas are often "savannah to dry rainforest." Flowering can begin in as soon as two years after germination.
In northeastern Brazil, the tree is primarily used as timber and for making wooden implements. "It is used in construction and for making door and window frames, barrels, mooring masts, hedges, platforms, floors, agricultural implements and railway sleepers." The wood is also reportedly a preferred source of cooking fuel, since it makes a hot and long-lasting fire. It is widely used there in the making of fences, since termites seem not to like it. At one time, it was used in the construction of houses, but people are finding it more difficult to find suitable trees for that purpose.
  
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Anadenanthera peregrina: Vilka or Yopo
Anadenanthera peregrina, also known as Yopo, Jopo, Cohoba, Parica or Calcium Tree, is a perennial tree of the Anadenanthera genus native to the Caribbean and South America. It grows up to 20 m tall, having a horny bark. Its flowers are pale yellow to white and spherical. It is not listed as being a threatened species. It is an entheogen used in healing ceremonies and rituals. It is also a well known source of dietary calcium. This plant is almost identical to that of a related tree, Anadenanthera colubrina, commonly known as CebŪl or Vilca. The beans of A. colubrina have a similar chemical makeup as Anadenanthera peregrine. The wood from A. peregrina is very hard and it is good for making furniture. It has a Janka rating of 3700 lb. and a density of around 0.86 g/cm. The beans (sometimes called seeds) and falling leaves are toxic to cattle.
RSB hasn't had a posted offering of these in many years, Some fresh stock arrived 03/21/2016, so we search engine going prices and our jaws dropped, prices, such as 50 seeds (7 or 8 grams)/$100.00. That's highway robbery. So we can only guess few will find better prices than ours.

Mimosa hostilis seeds and inner root bark

Desmnthus illinoensis seeds and root bark.

Click any photo image any where on this sight to view an enlargement and explanation of that image.
Ethically wild harvested organic.

  
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Argemone mexicana seeds and dried herb: Mexican poppy, Mexican prickly poppy, Flowering thistle
Mexican Prickly Poppy purified latex
Very fresh Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds from Mexico
Pedicularis bracteosa herb,AKA Elephant Head, herb, herbal extract and seeds
Illinois Bundle Flower Seeds & Roots Bark
Peruvian Torch cactus
Exqoisite T. bridgesii San Pedro cactus plants
orT. pachanoi San Pedro cactus
Very fresh Lophophora decepiens seeds forgrowing in 2016
Very fresh Ayahuasca powder for Florida
Tabernanthe iboga seeds
Very fresh Ololiuqu seeds from Mexico
Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose
Lactuca virosa 20:1 water purified essence

Perennial: Yellow blooms begin in June and continue until frost
begins. Will tolerate sub zero cold spells.
Ethically wild harvested organic dried herb, from Mexico.
A rugged survivor plant, itís tolerant of drought and poor soil, often being the only thing growing on new road sides. It has a bright yellow latex and flower, which are poisonous to grazing animals, and is seldom eaten, but itís used medicinally by people including those in its native area of the western US and parts of Mexico
The Seri of Sonora, Mexico use the entire plant both fresh and dried to relieve kidney pain, to help expel a torn placenta, and in general to help cleanse a womanís body after birth.
Word has leaked out from a single report in an issue of The Entheogen Review that this plant is superior to Argemone polyanthemos, at least 3 people participated, they first did bioassayes of brews made from A. mexicana, then, a day or so after did brews of A. polyanthemos, they reported that the A. polyanthemos had little effect at all, but they neglected to take into account the tolerance effect resulting from first dosing with A. mexicana, which, after a single dose will cause repeated doses of 20 times the original to be ineffective for up to 2 weeks. The truth is that thereís nothing medicinally better or worse about either A. mexicana or A. polyanthemos
To purchase this item click the v beside the - select amount- box below.
This product is not sold for consumption.
  
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Argemone polyanthemos seeds and dried herb: The wild medicinal Prickly Poppy from the SW US
For exquisite Prickly Poppy purified latex
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
The most beautiful/potent Wild Lettuce crystal extract ever
Perennial: Exquisite white blooms begin in June and continue until frost begins. See Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West by Michael Moore. Our herb and or extract contains no trace of mature or immature seeds -
Common in waste lands and seen sporadically throughout the SW, US desert mesas. Gets up to 4 feet tall and is no less beautiful than its cousin A. mexicana. Beautiful along driveways and in perennial wildflower gardens, goes well with cactus.
Seeds require scarification for good germination
Ethically wild harvested organic.
   
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Argyreia nervosa: Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Rivera corymbosa (AKA Ololiuqui) seeds
Heavenly Blue morning glory seeds
Blue Star Morning Glory
Seeds are the genuine species from Hawaii.
Seeds organically grown and untreated.
Sold for growing purposes only.

Many people believe that by receiving Baby Wood Rose seeds from Hawaii they're getting the most original and genuine species. But the story of Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose, Argyreia nervosa, is it's native to the Indian subcontinent and was introduced to the islands and other places world wide in the 1700's, the same Indian strain found in Hawaii naturalized more abundantly in many other geographical places. So provided the seeds are real A. nervosa they could come from just about anywhere on earth and be as good as if they were from Hawaii because they all originated on the Indian sub continent.

Closely related to the Morning Glory and Convolvulacea plant family it is reported to have similar pharmacological properties such as ergine, these properties were first brought to attention in the 1960s because its relatives had been used in shamanic rituals of Latin America for centuries
In most countries, including the US, it is legal to purchase, sell or germinate A. nervosa seeds. In the US the treating of Morning Glory and A. nervosa seeds to curtail people from consuming them was discontinued in the 1980ís along the lines of harm reduction, delinquent people would consume the treated seed anyway causing far more bodily harm than if they hadnít been treated, so the practice was considered pointless. No seeds sold by RSB have been treated Ė period.

Growing HBWR from seeds is easy in tropical, sub-tropical or in warm enough winter greenhouses. HBWR is a tropically acclimated plant and doesnít tolerate even meniscal frost, best to grow in conditions where overnight temperatures rarely ever drop below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.5 Celsius) First scarify the tip end of the seeds 1/16th inch with a shop or nail file; this is needed so the seeds sprout can penetrate its hard outer shell, then plant the seeds directly in prepared garden beds or greenhouse pots, you can also take the scarified seeds and enclose them in semi wet, not soggy, paper or cloth towels, then place the seeded wet towel in a container so the moisture wonít evaporate quickly, such as a jar or zipper bag, leave the prepared seeds for a few days where thereís constant room temperatures, HBWR seeds usually sprout within 3 to 10 days, and even old seeds, stored correctly, can have up to 98% germination rate. Once they germinate take the sprouted ones and plant them where suitable. HBWR will thrive best in rich loamus/sandy soil types, having adequate combinations of sand and fertility is important because the seeds tend to rot, but the additional sand will curtail this because it contains less bacteria than heavier soil types, keep the plants well watered, over watering them, unless theyíre growing in heavy soil types, wonít harm them. Some growers have said to be careful about over watering, Iíve never had any problems at all, but I always considered the types of soils they are native to and duplicated that for growing, sandy soils drain well; heavy soils donít, so naturally if growing in heavy soils be careful about over watering. They will begin blooming at the beginning of their second growing season, and sometimes the plants will stay small during their first year of growing even with good fertile soil to grow in, once their second growing season begins they take off and can overtake large areas, sometimes so much that pruning them back is needed, if their vines were straight and not curving/twisting around other plants or objects they reach lengths of over 50 feet, with multiple branches stemming off.
Happy Growing
   
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Ariocarpus fissuratus: Living Rock cactus
An extremely slow growing cactus in its native habitat, which is western Texas and parts of Mexico; it grows at near ground level and has a greyish green color that makes it difficult to see except during blooming when its pink flowers appear.
This cactus does have some history of shamanistic uses; it was mainly only used by indigenous people when peyote could not be found, and from all scientific analysis it would be a very poor substitute because it doesnít contain mescaline but has been found to contain other centrally active substances, such as N-methyltyramine and hordenine, albeit, in doses too small to be active.
This plant has been placed high on the US Department of Wildlifeís endangered species list, and Riverís Source Botanicals encourages everyone to be mindful of this,
The plant usually requires over a decade, under cultivation, to reach maturity. Due to this extremely slow growing nature itís not a favorable outdoor cactus garden plant because weeds are almost certain to overtake it quickly. Considered a rare cacti collectors plant its best cultivated by grafting it to a faster growing succulent, such as San Pedro.
However, many people enjoy growing it from seeds for fun. While the plant may be rare and slow growing it does produce very hardy seeds, according to Brian Lamb, author of numerous cactus texts, all cactus seeds have at least a triple or quadruple shelf life, meaning if stored in a cool dry location they can remain viable for a decade or more.
Click on any image anywhere on this site to view an enlargement of that photo.
  
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Banisteriopsis caapi whole herb: Ayahuasca, Vine Of the Soul
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Desmanthus illinoensis
Syrian Rue seeds
Syrian Rue water purified extract
Chacruna, Psychotria viridis seeds
Peruvian Torch cactus seeds
Bridgesii San Pedro cactus, Bolivian Torch cactus, Achuma cacti seeds
T. pachanoi San Pedro cactus cuttings, plants and seeds
Lophophora decipiens seeds
Ayahuasca, Banisteropsis caapi, Vine Of the Soul, dried stocks, fresh cuttings and seeds
Ariocarpus fissuratus cactus seeds
Tabernanthe iboga seeds
Ololiuqui
Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose
Heavenly Blue morning glory seeds
Blue Star Morning Glory
Grandpa Ott Morning Glory
Grandma Inas Morning Glory
Dream herb extract
Lactuca virosa
Banisteriopsis cappi, AKA ayahuasca, cappi or yagť, is a South American jungle vine in the family of Malpighiaceae. It is used to prepare ayahuasca, a boiled brew with a long history of entheogenic uses as a medicine and plant teacher among indigenous peoples in the Amazon Rainforest. It contains harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine, all of which are both beta-carboline harmala alkaloids and MAOIs used with other boiled plants in making ayahuasca. All parts of the plant contain the alkaloids.
Ayahuasca means "vine of the soul" in Quechan, and people of the indigenous western Amazonian tribes use the plant in religious and healing ceremonies. In addition to its hypnotic effect, cappi is used for its purgative healing properties, used externally to cleanse the body of parasites and help the GI system.

The below data regarding legality of B. cappi is partially taken from Wikipedia

In the US, the active parts of B. cappi, harmaline and harmala, are not controlled substances, if at some future date they did become they would likely classify the matter much like Canada now has regarding plants that contain controlled substances Ė theyíre not illegal: In Canada, harmala is listed under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act as a schedule III substance. The vine and the Ayahuasca brew are legal ambiguities, since nowhere in the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act is it stated that natural material containing a scheduled substance is illegal, a position supported by the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board.

In Australia, the harmala alkaloids are scheduled substances, including Harmine and harmaline, but the living vine, or other source plants are not in most states. On the State of Queensland as of March 2008 this distinction is now uncertain. In all states the dried herb may or may not be considered a scheduled substance, dependent on court rulings.

Caapi, as well as a range of harmala alkaloids, were recently scheduled in France, following a court victory by the Santo Daime religious sect allowing use of the tea due to it not being a chemical extraction and the fact that the plants used were not scheduled. Religious exceptions to narcotics laws are not allowed under French law, effectively making any use or possession of the tea illegal.


We're offering 8 inch fresh cuttings and refrigerated seeds for US customers only; they're shipped directly to you from our grower in Florida, shipped the same day cut; you might consider paying extra for express-mail shipping. To root simply plant the bottom 4 inches in a container of moist (not soggy) *sterilized course or fine sand; peat moss will work too. keep rooting medium constantly most, and don't allow the plant to be exposed to direct sunlight or freezing. Rooting will occur in 2 or 3 weeks spring through fall, 4 to 6 weeks in winter.
Organically grown in the US SE sub tropics.
To sterilize sand simply place a metal or Pyrex tray of 2 inch deep sand in an oven, at 150 degrees Fahrenheit, for at least 15 minutes. Allow sand to cool before planting.
This product is not sold for consumption
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Calea zacatechichi also Calea ternifolia dried herb: Dream herb
Dream Herb extract
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Pedicularis bracteosa,Elephant head herbal extract and seeds
Ethically wild harvested organic sun dried herb, from Mexico - no preservatives.
Calea zacatechichi AKA Calea, leaves of god, bitter-grass, Mexican calea, most commonly Dream Herb is in the aster family, It is native to Mexico and Central America.
In Mexico today itís used as a herbal remedy for dysentery and fever, and among indigenous people located in its native habitat there are isolated reports that describe rituals involving smoking it, drinking it as a tea, and placing it under a pillow to induce divinatory dreams. All things that Iíve had coincidental exposure to by being in the business of supplying the herb and manufacturing the concentrated extract, on one occasion, some years back, I was removing a large amount from the final extraction containers wearing rubber gloves and apron, I can only speculated that I must have accidentally breathed in microscopic particles, in the millionth of a gram, of its concentrated crystal extract, and that night I had intensely lucid dreams, where as other times I consumed say 200 to 300 mg of the extracted concentrate and had no such effect at all, form this I speculated the quantity of material required to induce lucid dreams could be a homeopathic one: the minuscule amount of herb dust one could breathe by placing a few leaves beside their pillow nights could be enough, or simply massaging 10 mg of crystals between ones fingers so some homeopathic amount would be absorbed through the skin, even 1% passing the skin might be enough. Albeit, as a professional herbal supplier I couldnít claim this herb is intended to heal, cure, treat or diagnosis anything, my only claim is that the herb sold is the genuine species and the extracted product contains the same ingredients as the leaves.


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Coleus blumei: also Plectranthus scutellarioides : Coleus
Coleus is a species in the family Lamiaceae, native to south East Asia and Malaysia. Growing to 2 to 2.5 feet tall and wide, it is a bushy, woody-based evergreen perennial in tropical and sub-tropical areas, widely grown for its decorative variegated leaves. Another common name is painted nettle.
There are two ways to propagate Coleus. Seeds are inexpensive and easily obtainable by selecting the item below. To germinate, simply sprinkle seeds on the surface soil and press down. Seeds need light to germinate, so avoid covering the seeds. To keep seeds moist, grow in a container and cover with plastic or mist seeds daily (if starting seeds directly in the garden). Sprouts can show color in as little as two weeks. Alternatively, cuttings can be taken. Cuttings root readily in plain water, without the addition of rooting hormone (although it is still beneficial
Coleus blumei (now known as Plectranthus scutellarioides) has been reported to have very mild relaxing and/or hallucinogenic effects when consumed. The effects of the Coleus plant have not been explored very much by modern scientists but the plant has been known to have been used by the Mazatec Indians of southern Mexico who have a history of consuming this plant for its mind-altering effects. It is not known what psychoactive chemical(s) exist in the Coleus blumei plant, as there has been very little research on the subject.



 
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Copal: Incense
Copal is a name given to tree resin that is particularly identified with the aromatic resins used by the cultures of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica as ceremonially burned incense and other purposes. More generally, the term copal describes resinous substances in an intermediate stage of polymerization and hardening between "gummier" resins and amber. The word copal is derived from the Nahuatl language word copalli, meaning "incense".
To the pre-Columbian Maya and contemporary Maya peoples it is known in the various Mayan languages as pom (or a close variation thereof), although the word itself has been demonstrated to be a loanword to Mayan from MixeĖZoquean languages.[citation needed]
Copal is still used by a number of indigenous peoples of Mexico and Central America as an incense and during sweat lodge ceremonies. It is available in different forms. The hard, amber-like yellow copal is a less expensive version. The white copal, a hard, milky, sticky substance, is a more expensive version of the same resin.
Copal was also found in East Africa (the common species there being Hymenaea verrucosa), initially feeding an Indian Ocean demand for incense. By the 18th century, Europeans found it to be a valuable ingredient in making a good wood varnish. It became widely used in the manufacture of furniture and carriages. It was also sometimes used as a picture varnish. By the late 19th and early 20th century varnish manufacturers in England and America were using it on train carriages, greatly swelling its demand.
In 1859 Americans consumed 68 percent of the East African trade, which was controlled through the Sultan of Zanzibar, with Germany receiving 24 percent. The American Civil War and the creation of the Suez Canal led to Germany, India and Hong Kong taking the majority by the end of that century.
East Africa apparently had a higher amount of subfossil copal, which is found one or two meters below living copal trees from roots of trees that may have lived thousands of years earlier. This subfossil copal produces a harder varnish. Subfossil copal is also well-known from New Zealand (Kauri gum), Japan, the Dominican Republic, Colombia and Madagascar. It often has inclusions and is sometimes sold as "young amber". Copal can be easily distinguished from genuine amber by its lighter citrine color and its surface getting tacky with a drop of acetone or chloroform

 
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Coryphantha macromeris: var. runyonii: Donanna cactus
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Peruvian Torch cactus
T. bridgesii San Pedro cactus
T. pachanoi San Pedro cactus
Lophophora cactus seeds-
Ariocarpus fissuratus cactus seeds
Rivera corymbosa, aka Ololiuqui
Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose
Scarlet cup cactus
This is an exquisite low growing cactus, rarely achieving a height of more than 8 inches, but spreads in diameter reaching distances of up to 4 feet across, but usually no more than 2 to 2.5 feet. It has elongated nodules that point upwards at a diagonal angel, and has up to 8 different length brown central spines. It thrives in shady places, under larger plants or partly covered by grass. The succulent nodules are small, rarely larger than 6 inches in long. The runyonii variation of southern Texas is shorter spined and forms large clumps of small stems (commonly referred to as buttons or pups). Its purple flowers bloom in July and have green kiwi tasting fruits in October.
The cactus has a broad native habitat in the Chihuahuan Desert where itís found in the Mexico states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, San Luis PotosŪ, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas; and in the US states of New Mexico and Texas . Its variation runyonii has a small separate habitat along Rio Grande, between Brownsville and Rio Grande City (Texas). Also a parallel habitat on the opposite river side in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. Again, itís said to be found only at elevations from sea level to 1,500 feet, but as with almost all plants it's found here and there outside what's considered it's native habitat, and Iíve seen it occasionally between Hatch and Las Cruses, NM at around 4,000 feet elevation, it has a way of standing out because of its much shorter spines.
It can easily be grown from seeds or cuttings, prefers sandy/gravel soil types, or can be grafted to larger fast growing cactus for an attractive ornamental.
There are reports that C. macromeris, specifically variation runyonii, is used for its active properties. However, there is debate about its psychoactive constitutes as it contains macromerine and normacromerine, analogues of epinephrine, but in concentrations too small to produce psychoactive effects unless an enormous quantity of 8 ounces of its dried noxious tasting plant was consumed. Possibly it contains other unknown psychoactive properties, albeit, I know of one person who reported once consuming about 8 ounces. As for myself I donít care what effect any plant that requires 8 or more ounces for a does is - thatís out of my bounds.
Our seeds are collected from wild plants found in southern NM no more than 35 miles from the Mexico border. I can only say they were collected from the genuine species but I wouldn't rule out the possibility they cross pollinated with C. marcomeris variation macromeris, I also would rule out that very little cross pollination occurs as 98% of all C. marcomeris grows in sheltered locations under desert shrubs such as bushy mystique trees and wild ephedra, often the plants are so sheltered that they can't bee seen until one takes a careful look under the desert shrubs which means its pollen wouldn't spread far due to its under growth locations.
  
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Datura inoxia seeds: Jimson Weed
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Peruvian Torch cactus
T. bridgesii San Pedro cactus
T. pachanoi San Pedro cactus
Lophophora cactus seeds-
Ariocarpus fissuratus cactus seeds
Rivera corymbosa, aka Ololiuqui
Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose
Scarlet cup cactus
Datura inoxia is an annual/perennial (depending on its location) bushy plant that typically reaches a height of 2 to 5 feet and that wide. Its leaves and stems have small soft grayish hairs, giving the whole plant a grayish appearance, albeit, plants grown under cultivation or in locations where they get a lot of water have fewer hairs and are a more deep green colored. It has leaves that can vary slightly in shape from one plant to the next, sometimes having smooth edges that are almost elliptic shaped, and sometimes edges that resemble ivy, but always characterized by the same consistent shade or hue of green. All parts of the plant have a noxious odor similar to rancid cooking oil, although most people find the fragrance of the flowers to be quite pleasant when they bloom early evenings through the night. Itís self-pollinating, which means it doesnít cross pollinate unless artificially done so by man.

The flowers are brilliant white with tints of purple, trumpet-shaped, 4.5 to 7.5 inches long. Flowering from June until late or early fall depending on the zone itís in.

The fruit is an oval-shaped spiny ball that can get up to 2 inches diameter and on first inspection discourages animals and people from touching them, It splits open after turning brownish when ripe emptying the pods of their seeds. The seeds are said to have a very long shelf life and can remain dormant in the soil for decades before germinating.

All parts of Datura plants are poisonous and can be fatal if ingested. Rumors originating with Carlos Castanedaís books about Don Juan suggest this species is some kind of shamanistic visionary plant, Phillip/owner RSB doesnít recommend anyone ever take this rumor seriously, if thereís any truth in it at all then it would be used at very low doses, and evidence suggest that poisonous concentrations vary significantly from plant to plant, so it would be impossible without mass spectrometry testing equipment to know exactly how much is in a specific plant. As well, thereís no researched data that says how much a safe dose is. Our seeds are intended for gardening and landscaping purposes only
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The plants are usually grown from seeds, but its perennial rhizomes can be kept from freezing and planted in the spring of the following year. Albeit, here at Taos, NMís 7,000 feet elevation (zone 5) Iíve had volunteer Datura plants survive over brutally cold winters. They rarely get large each consecutive year like they do in the warmer climates, or not without some kind of human intervention, such as digging, watering, and fertilizing around them. So to say they couldnít grow in cold climates isnít entirely true.

All Datura species contain highly toxic belladonna alkaloids. The Aztecs used the plant for many therapeutic purposes, such as externally for wounds where it acts as a pain reliever, caution advised. Although the Aztecs warned against ingestion of the plant, many native peoples used the plant for visions and rites of passage. The alkaloids of these plants are very similar to those of nightshade, and henbane, which are also highly poisonous plants that can be used externally , with caution, for effective pain relief

Datura intoxication usually produces a complete inability to differentiate reality from unreality: delirium, bizarre, and violent behavior; extreme dilation of the pupils, and sever light sensitivity that can last many days. Intense amnesia is another frequently reported effect. Many unfortunate incidents result from ingesting Datura in the 1990s and 2000s are reported in the United States media, containing stories of teenagers and younger adults dying or becoming seriously ill from intentionally ingesting Datura because they thought they could get high.



    
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Desmanthus illinoensis root bark and seeds: Illinois bundleflower, prairie-mimosa
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Tabernanthe Iboga seeds
Amanita muscaria variation formosa grade A pieces
Anadenanthera colubrina seeds
Ayahuasca stalks
Ephedra sinica seeds
St Johnís Wort seeds
Wild lettuce herb and seeds
Wild Four ĎO Clock
Blue lotus herb and seeds
Organically grown American ginseng roots
Syrian rue seeds
D. illinoensis gets 3 to 5 feet tall and 1.5 to 3 feet across, it has a great deal of resemblance to Mimosa with regards to its feather-like stem lined with many small leaflets that close nights or during summer rains, it could easily be confused with Mimosa pudica as the 2 plants look much alike and reach the same sizes. A very attractive yard and garden bed plant. Or it can be included while seeding wildflower beds or fields to add an exquisite exotic look, not unlike the practice of introducing grasses with wildflowers for a unique appearance. Itís also been planted in pastures to feed livestock because of the high protein content of its leaves, and it can be used in prairie restorations to improve worn-out soil. However, it recovers poorly from wildfires. Relatively open areas with a history of disturbance are preferred.
Grows easily from seeds and will tolerate sub-zero Fahrenheit temperatures. Grows best in fertile sandy loam soils, but adapts well too many other types. We grew a 1,000 square foot area of it in very poor Taos Valley, low organic matter, alkaline, sandy mesa soil by simply building it up with mountain dirt, no other supplements were ever added except what would be naturally be produced by using mulch. There are reports that this plant is a useful soil rejuvenator, itís said to have a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, that cause nodules on the roots that fix atmospheric nitrogen, but inspections of the roots by myself and other highly qualified horticulturist found no nodules on its roots, thatís not saying it doesnít fixate, just that it seems less likely. Many members of the Leguminosae family, which D. illinoensis is a member, do fixate nitrogen, but without data collected from professional horticulture research I would hesitate to say it fixates or not. Albeit, any crop, regardless of whether its clover, grass or weeds, turned under in the soil will aid in rejuvenation.
Abundant in many areas of the south central and Midwestern US states, it often grows on road sides, disturbed soils, near river banks in rocky sandy soil, or sometimes taking over entire fields where it gets full sun and ample water. Grows wild in some areas of New Mexico, especially in the farming areas of central NM, south of Albuquerque, where enough water and light are available for it. Itís speculated that the species was unintentionally introduced to central NM in the early 1900s when hay contaminated with the viable seeds from the central states was brought in by rail
We are stocking only our own organically grown root bark; these roots took 7 years to be ready for harvest!
   
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Echinocereus triglochidiatus seeds: Kingcup cactus, Claretcup, and Mojave mound cactu, Hedgehog cactus
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
This cactus native habitat is the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it grows in varied habitats from low desert to rocky slopes, scrub, and mountain woodland. Itís very common in shady areas.
There are many varieties, but not all are recognized. In general it is a mounding cactus, forming bulbous piles of few to hundreds of spherical to cylindrical stems. It is densely spiny and somewhat woolly. The bright red flowers are a funnel shaped bloom up to 3 to 3.5 inches long that close over night with bright scarlet red to orange-red petals. The flowers are able to self-pollinate but insects and humming birds often contribute to this too.
Some strains of this are listed as endangered species in the United States.
Thereís rumor that this species has some history of entheogenic use, however, Iíve never been able to locate any reliable data regarding this, mention is made of it Plants of The Gods and Pharmacotheogen, but both sources fail to give any specific information other than whatís speculated, and even this data has since been disputed by researchers. Itís an exquisite exotic cactus that youíll love watching grow Ė beyond this itís not important to most people.
Seed germination, sowing instructions: Echinocereus triglochidiatus is easy to grow from seeds. Sow seeds in sandy soil. Do not cover the small seeds, but press gentle into the earth. Keep seeds in constant moisture with temperatures of about 20 degrees C (68 degrees F). In winter, the dormant period, plants should be watered very carefully. In summer they may be watered more often.
Cold hardy to sub-zero Fahrenheit.
Trihocereus peruvianus, Peruvian Torch cactus seeds for sale
Summer 2015 Lophophora decipiens seeds
Peruvian Torch cactus seeds cuttings
T. bridgesii San Pedro cactus
T. pachanoi San Pedro cactus
Ariocarpus fissuratus cactus seeds
Ololiuqui
Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose
  
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EpenŠ PatricŠ powdered bark: Cumala, EpeŮa; Ebena; Nyakwana; ParicŠ, Virola rufula
Virola, also known as EpenŠ, PatricŠ, or Cumala, is a genus of medium-sized trees native to the South American rainforest and closely related to other Myristicaceae, such as nutmeg.
Many things are written regarding this species, and much is available through search engines. it would be to complicated to repeat it all here.
RSB warranties only that the species is accurately identified, beyond this no warranties are express or implied.
Blessings to all researchers

Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds

Banisteriopsis caapi, Ayahuasa

Fall 2015 harvested Chacruna herb powder organically grown in Florida

2016 harvested Tabernanthe iboga seeds from Cameroon

Trihocereus peruvianus, Peruvian Torch cactus seeds, they're amazing to grow

Fall 2015 harvested Ephedra viridis/Mormon tea, from New Mexico
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Ephedra major, seasonal dried herb : Ma Huang, Ephedra herb
Ephedra sinica seeds, RSB's best selling item
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Trihocereus peruvianus, Peruvian Torch cactus seeds for sale
Summer 2015 Lophophora decipiens seeds
Purchase Trichocereus bridgesii dried cactus products
Fall 2015 harvested Chacruna herb powder organically grown in Florida, now available in bulk
Banisteriopsis caapi Ayahuasa
2016 recently harvested Tabernanthe iboga seeds from Cameroon
This plant is most commonly called Ma Huang because few people distinguish it from its relative E. sinica. It has a few different common names in various languages but no official one in English.
Itís Widespread from the Canary Islands to Spain through the Mediterranean and extending eastwards to Pakistan and India.
Most members of this plant family contain medicinally active alkaloids (notably ephedrine), widely used in preparations for the treatment of allergies, atarrh, and asthma. E. major is the richest source of ephedrine in India; the stems contain more than 2.5% total alkaloids, of which about 75% is ephedrine. The whole plant can be used at much lower concentrations than the isolated constituents - unlike using the extracted ephedrine, using the whole plant rarely gives rise to side-effects, simply because most people feel it unnatural to consume larger quantities, were-as with popping tiny pills of the isolated alkaloid it can seem like no big deal.
RSB is merely a botanical supply source and we've no interest in participating in the prepared ephedrine market. Regrettably, anyone with one of our exquisite Ephedra plants is gong to spend a few years growing it large enough to make a few cups of tea to relieve allergy symptoms.

Ephedra plant also has antiviral effects, especially against influenza. The stems are a pungent, bitter, warm herb that dilates respiratory channels, while also stimulating the heart and central nervous system. The stems are, diuretic, fever reducing, raises blood pressure, soothing the nerves, warming to the breast or chest area, physically strengthening, constriction and dilation of the blood vessels; and sometimes perspiration causing.
Ephedra is used internally in the treatment of asthma, hay fever and allergic complaints. This herb should be used with caution in people who have existing health complications, preferably under the supervision of a qualified practitioner, It should not be prescribed to patients who are taking synthetic monoamine oxidation inhibitors or suffering from high blood pressure, hyperthyroidism, glaucoma or prostrate problems. Ephedrine is seen as a performance-enhancing herb and is a prohibited substance in many sports.
In the state of Colorado, USA, driving while under the influence of ephedrine is the same as DWI. Persons required to take periodic drug screen test there might do well to avoid this without a doctorís prescription as one will be positive for amphetamines in initial urine analysis test. Second test can be done to determine if the drug is ephedrine or an amphetamine, and thereís always the possibility one might have to spend a night or 2 in jail before the second test results come back if the person is on probation.
Growing ephedra from cuttings is easy. First cut a piece of the woody stem at a vertical angle then make small slices at the bottom end of the woody stem, dip the sliced end in root toner, then plant the cutting in sand, rock wool or perilite, keep the rooting medium and the whole plant wet (spray with a spray bottle 3 or 4 times daily) until evidence of roots appear. One would do best to get one of those 10.5 inch wide by 21 inch long by 8 inch high planter tray covering domes, w/tray, and keep the cutting(s) inside it so the moisture around the cutting will stay constant and there will be little or no need to use a spray bottle to keep the cutting moist, and only occasionally need to water its growing medium. Spring through early fall is the best seasons to root; cuttings tend to root very slowly in winter and can often not make it at all.

       
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Ephedra sinica seeds: Ma Huang
2016 recently harvested Tabernanthe iboga seeds from Cameroon
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Ephedra belongs to the Ephedraceae family of plants, and while there are many strains itís the only member of the species.
Ephedra has traditionally been used by indigenous people for a variety of medicinal uses, such as asthma, hay fever, and the common cold.
Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are active constituents of E. sinica and other strains. These compounds have stimulant and decongestant qualities and are related chemically to amphetamines. Some people, including myself, have unintentionally got in trouble with law enforcement by using ephedra for allergy relief and then charged with DWI because they appeared to be stimulated - charged with driving under the influence of methamphetamine's. By using ephedra people will test positive for amphetamines in the initial urine screening, but a second, more complex screening, can be done to determine if the person was using meth or ephedra. It can cost a small fortune in legal fees to have this happen.
Growing ephedra from seeds is easy, sow the seeds directly on tilled soil and cover with ľ inch of pressed garden soil, keep soil constantly wet until a couple weeks after germination. The seedlings will grow very slowly, however, even as tiny seedlings they are very drought tolerant and cold hardy. Iíve had seedlings started indoors that I neglected watering for months that survived. All ephedra species are very slow growing; the herb is harvested after the plants bloom in late spring or early summer every other year or every third year depending on the rate of growth.
Ironically RSB doesnít have E. sinica growing on the property; rather we grow E. major which looks identical except its flowers and seeds.
  
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Ephedra torreyana: Mormon Tea, Torrey's jointfir, Torrey's Mormon tea
Ephedra sinica seeds, RSB's best selling item
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Trihocereus peruvianus, Peruvian Torch cactus seeds for sale
Summer 2015 Lophophora decipiens seeds
Purchase Trichocereus bridgesii dried cactus products
Fall 2015 harvested Chacruna herb powder organically grown in Florida, now available in bulk
Banisteriopsis caapi Ayahuasa
2016 recently harvested Tabernanthe iboga seeds from Cameroon
2015 harvested Ephedra viridis/Mormon tea, from New Mexico
For Wild Lettuce dried herb, water purified extract and seeds
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Ephedra viridis whole herb: Mormon tea
People seeking to use Mormon Tea as a beverage in increments smaller than a gallon at a time will find the course ground material we offer really isn't suitable, the finer ground herb is easier to measure and cook in smaller spaces because it takes up less volume. Ephedra viridis herb is the most difficult material we ever put through our hammer mill. It's very tough on kitchen grinders too, so the finer ground got from us is recommended for all but those with tools to process it.
Ephedra sinica seeds, RSB's best selling item
For Mimosa hostilis inner root bark powder and seeds
Trihocereus peruvianus, Peruvian Torch cactus seeds for sale
Summer 2015 Lophophora decipiens seeds
Purchase Trichocereus bridgesii dried cactus products
Fall 2015 harvested Chacruna herb powder organically grown in Florida, now available in bulk
Banisteriopsis caapi Ayahuasa
2016 recently harvested Tabernanthe iboga seeds from Cameroon
2015 harvested Ephedra viridis/Mormon tea, from New Mexico
For Wild Lettuce dried herb, water purified extract and seeds
Ephedra viridis, known by the common names green Mormon tea, green ephedra, and Indian tea, is a species of Ephedra. It is indigenous to the Western United States, where it is a member of varied scrub, woodland, desert, and open habitats. It grows at 900Ė2,300 metres (3,000Ė7,500 ft) elevations.
Ephedra viridis shrub is woody below, topped with many dense clusters of erect bright green twigs. They may yellow somewhat with age.
Nodes along the twigs are marked by the tiny pairs of vestigial leaves, which start out reddish but soon dry to brown or black. Since the leaves are no longer functional, the stems are green and photosynthetic.
Male plants produce pollen cones at the nodes, each under a centimeter long with protruding yellowish sporangiophores. Female plants produce seed cones which are slightly larger and contain two seeds each.
Uses
The drug ephedrine, an antidepressant and decongestant, is made from this and other Ephedra species. A tea can be made by boiling the stems, explaining the common name "green Mormon tea".
This ephedra contains many ephedrine like alkaloids but no real ephedrine. Tea of this is said to produce a mild stimulation and got it's common name because the early Mormons used it as a coffee substitute due to it's mild caffeine stimulation effect., and it's natural availability in their geographical location. Excellent for many who suffer allergies.
Wild crafted - organic.
   
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Eschscholzia californica seeds and dried herb: California Poppy
A lA lovely smooth leaf poppy with brilliant orange blooms, has some characteristics of Papaver species poppies; a species of flowering plant in the family Papaveraceae, native to the United States and Mexico, and the official state flower of California.
Range: California, extending to Oregon, southern Washington, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and in Mexico in Sonora and northwest Baja California.
It grows well in disturbed areas. In addition to being planted for Horticulture, revegetation, and highway beautification, it often colonizes along roadsides and other disturbed areas. It is drought-tolerant, self-seeding, and easy to grow in gardens.
California poppy has been used by Native Americanís for generations for relaxation and reducing pain. It has been described that this native plant has sedative chemical components similar to that of the Opium poppy, yet are very safe and non-addictive. In fact, it is described in literature that California poppy is safe for most individuals including children. California poppy can be purchased in liquid extract (tincture) form or dried and used as medicinal tea. It combines beautifully with other herbs including skullcap, passion flower, and wild oat.
Other goods of like interest are
Oriental poppy dried herb and standardized extract
Mexican prickly poppy dried herb, water purified crystal extracts and seeds
Pedicularis bracteosa herb, AKA Elephant Head whole herb, extract and seeds
Wild US Prickly poppy herb, wholesale/retail
Purchase Lactuca virosa herb, seeds, and herbal extract
  
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Growing Aids

Cold Stratification

Growing Water Lily from Seeds

Complete Cacti Cultivation Instructions:

CONTENTS:
Page 1 - Growing Lophophora diffusa and Trichocereus peruvianus Cactus from Seeds
Page 2 - Cactus Grafting Report
Page 3 - Step By Step Grafting
Page 4 - Cacti Cultivation from Cuttings